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Pantoprazole (Intravenous route)

Pronunciation:

pan-TOE-pra-zole

Brand Names:

  • Protonix
  • Protonix IV

Dosage Forms:

  • Powder for Solution

Classifications:

Therapeutic—

Gastric Acid Secretion Inhibitor

Pharmacologic—

Proton Pump Inhibitor

Uses of This Medicine:

Pantoprazole injection is used to treat certain conditions in which there is too much acid in the stomach. It is used for short-term treatment (7 to 10 days) of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with a history of erosive esophagitis. GERD is a condition in which the acid in the stomach washes back up into the esophagus. This medicine may also be used to treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or other conditions (eg, cancer) in which the stomach produces too much acid.

Pantoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). It works by decreasing the amount of acid produced by the stomach.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before Using This Medicine:

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies—

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Children—

Appropriate studies have not been performed on the relationship of age to the effects of pantoprazole injection in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Older adults—

Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated geriatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of pantoprazole injection in the elderly.

Pregnancy—

Pregnancy CategoryExplanation
All TrimestersBAnimal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate studies in pregnant women OR animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus.

Breast-feeding—

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Other medicines—

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are receiving this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Rilpivirine

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Atazanavir
  • Bosutinib
  • Cilostazol
  • Citalopram
  • Dasatinib
  • Erlotinib
  • Eslicarbazepine Acetate
  • Gefitinib
  • Ketoconazole
  • Ledipasvir
  • Methotrexate
  • Mycophenolate Mofetil
  • Nelfinavir
  • Nilotinib
  • Pazopanib
  • Saquinavir
  • Velpatasvir
  • Vismodegib

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Levothyroxine
  • Warfarin

Other interactions—

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Cranberry

Other medical problems—

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Diarrhea or
  • Hypomagnesemia (low magnesium in the blood), history of or
  • Kidney disease or
  • Osteoporosis (thinning of the bones) or
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or
  • Zinc deficiency—Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Liver disease—Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Proper Use of This Medicine:

A nurse or other trained health professional will give you this medicine in a clinic or hospital. This medicine is given through a needle placed in one of your veins.

It may take several days before this medicine begins to relieve stomach pain. To help relieve this pain, antacids may be taken with pantoprazole, unless your doctor has told you not to use them.

Tell your doctor if you have had problems with a lack of zinc in your body. Your doctor may want you to take zinc supplements.

Your doctor will give you a few doses of this medicine until your condition improves, and then switch you to an oral medicine that works the same way. If you have any concerns about this, talk to your doctor.

Precautions While Using This Medicine:

It is important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. If your condition does not improve, or if it becomes worse, check with your doctor.

This medicine may cause serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Tell your doctor right away if you have a rash, itching, hoarseness, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth after you receive the medicine.

Serious skin reactions can occur with this medicine. Tell your doctor right away if you have blistering, peeling, or loose skin, red skin lesions, severe acne or skin rash, sores or ulcers on the skin, or fever or chills while you are using this medicine.

This medicine may cause an injection site reaction called thrombophlebitis. Check with your doctor right away if you notice any of these side effects at the injection site: changes in skin color, pain, tenderness, or swelling of the foot or leg.

Check with your doctor right away if you have a fever, joint pain, skin rash, swelling of the body, feet, or ankles, or unusual weight gain after receiving this medicine. These could be symptoms of acute interstitial nephritis.

Check with your doctor right away if you have watery diarrhea that does not go away, stomach pain, and a fever while receiving this medicine.

Pantoprazole injection may increase your risk of having fractures of the hip, wrist, and spine. This is more likely if you are 50 years of age and older, if you receive high doses of this medicine, or use it for one year or more.

This medicine may cause hypomagnesemia (low magnesium in the blood). This is more likely to occur if you are using this medicine for more than 1 year, or if you are using this medicine together with digoxin (Lanoxin®) or certain diuretics (water pills). Check with your doctor right away if you have convulsions (seizures), fast, racing, or uneven heartbeat, muscle spasms (tetany), tremors, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Cutaneous or systemic lupus erythematosus may occur or get worse in patients receiving a PPI. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or a skin rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse when exposed to the sun.

Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. This medicine may affect the results of certain medical tests.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription (eg, atazanavir, nelfinavir, Reyataz®, Viracept®) or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects of This Medicine:

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common
Accumulation of pus
bleeding, blistering, burning, coldness, discoloration of the skin, feeling of pressure, hives, infection, inflammation, itching, lumps, numbness, pain, rash, redness, scarring, soreness, stinging, swelling, tenderness, tingling, ulceration, or warmth at the injection site
changes in skin color
fever
pain, tenderness, or swelling of the foot or leg
stomach pain
swollen, red, tender area of infection
Rare
Drowsiness
loss of appetite
mood or mental changes
muscle spasms (tetany) or twitching
nausea or vomiting
seizures
trembling
unusual tiredness or weakness
Incidence not known
Abdominal or stomach tenderness
absence of or decrease in body movement
blindness
blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
bloating of the abdomen or stomach
bloody or cloudy urine
bloody, black, or tarry stools
blurred vision
chills
constipation
continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
cough
dark-colored urine
decreased vision
diarrhea
difficulty with speaking
difficulty with swallowing
dizziness or lightheadedness
fast heartbeat
feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings
greatly decreased frequency of urination or amount of urine
hearing loss
hives, itching, or rash
increased watering of the mouth
indigestion
joint or muscle pain
large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
light-colored stools
muscle cramps, pain, or stiffness
pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
pale skin
puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
red skin lesions, often with a purple center
red, irritated eyes
sensation of spinning
severe abdominal or stomach cramps or pain
sore throat
sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
swelling of the feet or lower legs
swollen glands
tightness in the chest
unexplained bleeding or bruising
watery and severe diarrhea, which may also be bloody
yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
Headache
Less common
Acid or sour stomach
belching
dizziness
excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
full feeling
passing gas

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.


Last Updated: 8/4/2017
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